The Man on Cloud Mountain

ZEN, Teaching of zen, Shodo Harada Roshi in America 1/7 youtube.com

The True way of Zen by Shodo Harada. Harada Roshi is a Rinzai priest, author, and head abbot of Sogenji Zen temple in Okayama, Japan.

Videos:
ZEN, Teaching of zen, Shodo Harada Roshi in America 2/7 youtube.com
ZEN, Teaching of zen, Shodo Harada Roshi in America 3/7 youtube.com
ZEN, Teaching of zen, Shodo Harada Roshi in America 4/7 youtube.com
ZEN, Teaching of zen, Shodo Harada Roshi in America 5/7 youtube.com
ZEN, Teaching of zen, Shodo Harada Roshi in America 6/7 youtube.com
ZEN, Teaching of zen, Shodo Harada Roshi in America 7/7 youtube.com

Links:
Shodo Harada wikipedia.org

Books:
Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind
Shunryu Suzuki
ISBN 0834800799

Nothing Special: Living Zen
Charlotte Joko Beck, Steve Smith
ISBN 0062511173

Walking Meditation
Thich Nhat Hanh, Anh-Huong Nguyen
ISBN 1591794730

The ego is a monkey

The ego is a monkey catapulting through the jungle: Totally fascinated by the realm of the senses, it swings from one desire to the next, one conflict to the next, one self-centered idea to the next. If you threaten it, it actually fears for its life. Let this monkey go. Let the senses go. Let desires go. Let conflicts go. Let ideas go. Let the fiction of life and death go. Just remain in the center, watching. And then forget that you are there.

Hua Hu Ching X

The Mindfulness of Thich Nhat Hanh


Thich Nhat Hanh, Plum Village plumvillage.org

mindfulness is awareness of one’s thoughts, actions or motivations. wikipedia.org

Reference:
The clip is from the DVD accompanying the book “Walking Meditation
” (sep 2006) Thich Nhat Hanh, Anh-Huong Nguyen, ISBN 1591794730

Books:
The Miracle of Mindfulness: A Manual on Meditation
(dec 1999) Thich Nhat Hanh
ISBN 9780807012390
The Blooming of a Lotus: Guided Meditation for Achieving the Miracle of Mindfulness
(jun 1999) Thich Nhat Hanh
ISBN 0807012378

Links:
Mindfulness of Ourselves, Mindfulness of Others www.explorefaith.org
Ram Dass interviews Thicht Nhat Hanh youtube.com (mindfulness)

Meditative Mind

The tricks for reaching a deep meditative mind are: do not resist, do not concentrate, do not persist, and most importantly of all, dot not be disturbed emotionally.

In meditation, the more you restrict your mind from wandering, the more it will try to escape your control. It is like trying to force your self to sleep – it just cannot be done. The mind is very stubborn and cannot be pushed. It can, however be led. Like water, the more you push, the more ways it will find to get around you. But if you led it correctly, it will flow smoothly even into the deepest places.

Moreover, when you meditate in this way, you should not concentrate. To much concentration will only generate greater resistance. Instead, simply pay attention. Concentration will make you tired and tense. This will worsen the situation. You should not allow your mind to dwell upon thoughts or problems occurring outside of your body. When you notice that your mind is constantly returning to the same thought patterns, bring it gently back to the center of your spirit. The center of your spirit is located at what is called the third eye, in the center of your forehead. Remember that deep, even breathing can help you achieve and maintain this metal centering.

Above all, never become upset with your self if you have difficulty leading your mind into a deep meditative state. Emotional disturbance will only create more tension in your mind, and further hamper your efforts.

Shaolin White Crane Martial Power and Qigong by Dr. Yang, Jwing Ming
ISBN 1886969353

P. 190

The heart is calm and quiet as still water

Wang Ji Wu

One must always maintain a calm heart even when influenced by the seven emotions; joy, anger, happiness, worry, sadness, fear and surprise. The heart must remain as calm as still water, never allowing any personal desires to stir up a ripple of disturbance. My thoughts are pure, in spirit I seek to forget myself and transcend the common affairs of the world, keeping my life simple and my desires few. With a clear heart, I do not contend with others or make demands upon the world, but rather seek to contribute what I can for the benefit of all, aiding those in need and protecting those in danger.

Without desire one is strong, without desire one is quiet, without desire one may return to what is natural, without desire one returns to the original state. With a heart still like water, from the extreme stillness will spring action, from the void comes that which is alive, yin and yang are in harmony and the qi flows unimpeded. With a heart still like water qi is sufficient and the spirit full. When the qi is sufficient and the spirit is full, the organs functions normally, the blood is nourished, the meridians, nerves, digestion, and circulation are all healthy and the metabolism stimulated. When the factors which prevent aging all are strong, one may prevent illness and live a long healthy life.

Humans are holistic beings which are possessed by of a certain vitality. The spirit and flesh are inseparable and form a complicated entity. The human vitality supports, influences, and is responsive to the person as a whole, while the spirit is the leader and controller, the “commander-in-cheif” of the being as a whole. Under certain circumstances, it can be said that the spirit “pulls at one hair and the whole body follows” or at the slightest stirring of the spirit the whole being responds, and each movement of the spirit has a real effect on the individual. Therefore I put special emphasis on the spirit as the leader, ever strengthening my resolve to cultivate my spirit, maintain calmness of the heart and become as pure as light without a speck of dust. This is akin to the meaning of a Song Dynasty poet who wrote “to understand the highest virtue,” applied to the present time. Better yet, this cultivation of the spirit and the heart will improve the physical constitution of the people, protect their health, and contribute to a long and healthy life.

Xing Yi Nei Gong: Health Maintenance and Internal Strength Development
compiled and edited by Dan Miller and Tim Cartmell

ISBN 0865681740
p. 30-31