Jeijin – receiving energy

According to Huang Sheng-Shyan, the difference between taiji and other martial arts, is that taiji can ultimately develop jeijin (receiving energy), where yielding, neutralizing and discharging, all happen simultaneously. There is hardly any physical movement, and no mental intention at all, everything happens spontaneously and naturally. The practitioner is in a state of absolute central Read More

Qian Zhao Hong

WACIMA Master Qian Zhao Hong is one of the best Xing Yi fighters in China: member of Shanghai Wu Shu Association, Vice Chairman of Institute of Shanghai Pa-Kua, Vice Chairman of Institute of Shanghai Wu Dong Qigong, and Highest level Ninth Generation of Xin Yi Liu He Quan (10 Animal Xing Yi). He has defeated Read More

The All-Round Standing Pole Exercise

Stand with feet apart at shoulder width, toes point forward or slightly outward. Bend the knees and sit down slightly, weight centered firmly on the soles of the feet. Keep the head and spine erect from tip to tail, chest empty (i.e. relaxed and slightly concave, never stuck out) and stomach full and relaxed, not Read More

Chen Wei-Ming on Agility

If the body is clumsy, then in advancing or retreating it cannot be free; therefore it most be agile. Once you raise your arm, you cannot appear clumsy. The moment the force of the opponent touches my skin and hair, my mind is already penetrating his bones. When holding up the arms, the chi (breath) Read More

Anecdotes Of Dachengquan Founder Wang Xiangzhai

by Wang Xuanjie (Translated by Chen Shengtao) DACHENGQUAN is a set of barehanded exercises for health-keeping and combat. It was developed by my instructor Wang Xiangzhai in Beijing in the 1940s. The following anecdotes about him will help you learn something more about Wang and his dachengquan. When Wang Xiangzhai created dachengquan half a century Read More

The Mighty Warrior Exercise

(Ichuan, Dachengquan, Yiquan, exercise, qiqong, chikung, breathing, energy) The Mighty Warrior Exercise Stand with the feet about double shoulder-width apart and toes pointing ahead. Bend the knees while lowering the body to stand in a horse-riding posture. Raise the arms sideways to form each an angle of about 60 degrees with the torso, the palms Read More

Expositions of Insights Into the Practice of the Thirteen Postures

by Wu Yu-hsiang (Wu Yuxian) (1812 – 1880) sometimes attributed to Wang Chung-yueh as researched by Lee N. Scheele The hsin [mind-and-heart] mobilizes the ch’i [vital life energy]. Make the ch’i sink calmly; then the ch’i gathers and permeates the bones. The ch’i mobilizes the body. Make it move smoothly, so that it may easily Read More

Wu-Yü-Hsiang Body Principles

Relax the chest. Raise the back. Enclose solar plexus. Protect the cheekbones. Lift the head. Suspend the solar plexus. Loosen the shoulders. Sink the elbows. Be evasive. Avoid conflict. Reference: Tai Chi Touchstones: Yang Family Secret Transmissions by Douglas Wile Sweet Chi Press, April 1989 ISBN: 091205901X Page: 27

Sam Tam – 2006 Copenhagen Summer Workshop

Master Sam Tam comes to Copenhagen from the 2. to 4. of June 2006 to give a workshop at Ole Eskildens Ichuan Standing Meditation School. Master Sam Tam travels around the US and Canada giving workshops in pushhands in Ichuan and Taiji. Ichuan people would properly know Sam Tam by name from Jan Diepersloot’s book Read More

Wang Xiangzhai – General Principles for Dachengquan

Directions in verse for Great Achievements Shadow Boxing Integrated with spirit and mind, This boxing is named Dacheng. With plain truth easy to understand, It is both interesting and enlightening. It has no method yet every method, for in boxing all methods are of no avail. With profound knowledge it helps to mould your temperament, Read More