Chen Wei-Ming on Internal Power The Complete Chin

The chin of the (whole) body, through practice becomes one unit. Distinguish clearly between substantiel and insubstantiel. To fa chin (discharge) it is necessary to have root. The chin starts from the foot, is commanded by the waist, and manifested in the fingers, and discharges through the spine and back. One must completely raise the Read More

Song of Application

Light, agile, and alive, seek Dong Jin (understanding Jin); Yin and Yang cooperate mutually without the fault of stagnation; If (you) acquire (the trick), four ounces neutralizes one thousand pounds; Expand and close, stimulate the “drum,” the center will be steady. “Alive” here means alert and active. In practice you must pay close attention to Read More

Chen Wei-Ming on Breath To Gahter the Chi

If the chi is dispersed, then it is not stored (accumulated) and is easy to scatter. Let the chi penetrate the spine and the inhalation and exhalation be smooth and unimpeded throughout the entire body. The inhalation closes and gathers, the exhalation opens and discharges. Because the inhalation can naturally raise and also uproot the Read More

The Ten Essentials of Taijiquan

Narrated by Yang Cheng Fu Recorded by Chen Wei Ming 1. Straightening The Head Stand straight and hold the head and neck naturally erect, with the mind concentrated on the top. Do not strain or be tense; otherwise, the blood and vital energy cannot circulate smoothly. 2. Correct Position Of Chest And Back Keep the Read More

Waves of Movement

Author: Patrik Kelly (by courtesy of patrickkellytaiji.com) All fluids move in waves. Energy moves through fluids either as a transfer of mass with a stored momentum, or as a wave of elastic displacement that leaves the medium undisturbed once it has passed. Stored momentum gives a more external force and elastic displacement a more internal Read More

Practising the Classics

by Wee Kee-Jin In Taijiquan, we must know the direction we want to head in, then focus on the process not the result. Practising the right process will take you to where you want to go. Even knowing and preaching the Taijiquan ‘classics’ will not amount to anything, if you don’t practise it. Structure The Read More

Important Points for Progress in Taijiquan

by Wee Kee-Jin Master Huang was a renowned practitioner, but it was as a teacher that he most stood out. He developed exercises and a systemised training method that recognised the stages of a student’s development. Physical Mechanisms When learning Taijiquan we all start with poor posture and awkward actions. So we need to work Read More

The Importance of Sequence and Timing to Achieve Synchronization

by Wee Kee-Jin The Taiji Form regardless of what style, was created as a means to train moving in a synchronized and harmonious Taiji way. During Pushing-hands we extend the practise of synchronized movement to include when being effected by an external force. When we can synchronize all the physical (external) and mental (internal) movements Read More

Open Taijidag ’06 in Amsterdam

Stichting Taijiquan Nederland invites the whole world to an open Taiji day with forms, demo shows, workshops and competition in Amsterdam, Holland all day 28. October 2006. Amsterdam, Holland, Europe SPORTHALLEN ZUID Sporthallen Zuid, Burgerweeshuispad 54, 1076 EP Amsterdamzaal Enterance 8.30 (9 -17) € 7,- per person http://www.taijiquan.nl Open Taijidag 2006 Invitation (pdf)

The Harmony of Yin and Yang

As the Yang energy arises in another it is embraced with your Yin energy and becomes one harmonious energetic interaction. Dualistic thought is lost as one flowing energetic movement is embraced so that it is only one movement and not two. When this is demonstrated it appears as one seamless, graceful flowing movement without any Read More

Jeijin – receiving energy

According to Huang Sheng-Shyan, the difference between taiji and other martial arts, is that taiji can ultimately develop jeijin (receiving energy), where yielding, neutralizing and discharging, all happen simultaneously. There is hardly any physical movement, and no mental intention at all, everything happens spontaneously and naturally. The practitioner is in a state of absolute central Read More

Chen Wei-Ming on Agility

If the body is clumsy, then in advancing or retreating it cannot be free; therefore it most be agile. Once you raise your arm, you cannot appear clumsy. The moment the force of the opponent touches my skin and hair, my mind is already penetrating his bones. When holding up the arms, the chi (breath) Read More